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  • Ventricular Fibrilation (VF) is a cahotic ventricular rhythm preceding the cardiac arrest. VF is characterised by chaotic electrical impulses, which originate
    1 KB (169 words) - 04:30, 1 October 2013
  • shock may lead to hypoxemia (a lack of oxygen in arterial blood) or cardiac arrest (the heart stopping).One of the key dangers of shock is that it progresses
    9 KB (1,391 words) - 00:05, 28 August 2015
  • standard of care, as specified by ACLS guidelines. As in many forms of cardiac arrest, prognosis is decidedly poor. Asystole remains one of the most important
    4 KB (551 words) - 05:25, 9 August 2009
  • a lifesaving technique employed in the event of sudden cardiac arrest. Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when an individual’s heart no longer is beating suddenly
    5 KB (828 words) - 18:59, 16 April 2016
  • organs of the body. This could lead to cardiac arrest and other organ failure. Patient should be taken to cardiac surgery hospital. 3.Anaphylactic shock-
    19 KB (2,687 words) - 02:26, 9 February 2016
  • should learn. They can be used in an emergency and can be used after a cardiac arrest or after an accident. They can be done by regular people after a short
    3 KB (603 words) - 23:17, 25 July 2011
  • norepinephrine. However the effects of this drug can lead to an increase risk of cardiac arrest and therefore candidates for this drug must undergo a through medical
    32 KB (3,930 words) - 03:25, 8 May 2016
  • survivors of cardiac arrest: a prospective study in the Netherlands. Parnia and Fenwick (2002). Near death experiences in cardiac arrest: visions of a
    944 KB (144,050 words) - 01:05, 21 April 2016
  • himself. He interviewed over a hundred patients, who after experiencing cardiac arrest, were revived. Sabom was amazed to find that these people had seen things
    33 KB (5,495 words) - 19:29, 5 July 2016
  • life after death. During the operation but prior to her being put in cardiac arrest, Reynolds later reported hearing a sound like a natural 'D'. The sound
    11 KB (1,804 words) - 05:07, 22 October 2015
  • 95% of all cardiac arrest victims die before reaching the hospital. 60% of these people could have been saved if an AED was used. In a cardiac emergency
    8 KB (1,326 words) - 16:23, 7 April 2016
  • stress can generate physiological responses such as hypertension and cardiac arrest (Tobo-Medina & Canaval-Erazo, 2010).. Fear Is a basic emotion which
    28 KB (3,416 words) - 03:31, 8 May 2016
  • the dreaded arrhythmias which often results in angina and subsequent cardiac arrest. The emotion of anger is a dangerous emotion and an anger fuelled temper
    42 KB (5,383 words) - 04:29, 12 February 2016
  • Vision. van Lommel et al (2001). Near-death experience in survivors of cardiac arrest: a prospective study in the Netherlands. van Lommel (2003). Open Letter
    22 KB (3,176 words) - 14:21, 4 August 2014
  • increases and decreases in heart blood pressure, the use of meth can onset cardiac arrest, aneurysms, and create damage to the heart (Covey, 2007). Respiratory
    30 KB (3,731 words) - 14:54, 8 May 2016
  • and even tasers can cause unintentional deaths due to the impact or cardiac arrest). For the darts, needle/syringe-like ones should be used (to reduce
    10 KB (1,680 words) - 22:20, 28 October 2013
  • that specialized in ventilated patients. While there, she suffered a cardiac arrest with anoxia that resulted in severe, irreversible brain damage. She
    56 KB (8,689 words) - 13:26, 28 June 2016
  • to a laughing fit which could cause death. These responses could be cardiac arrests, or asphyxiation. Possible reasons for people suffering from this could
    26 KB (3,943 words) - 14:52, 8 May 2016
  • weakness, restlessness, nausea and vomiting, seizures, delirium, and cardiac arrest. Withdrawal is much more severe than that associated with opiates and
    52 KB (7,594 words) - 22:10, 29 November 2014
  • intravascular spaces. Plasma volume expansion is accompanied by an increase of cardiac and urinary output, of blood pressure (hemodynamic action). Polyglucin
    70 KB (10,042 words) - 22:04, 28 August 2011

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