Problem set for radiation astronomy

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This is a visual image of beta Virginis. Its effective surface temperature is 6,132 K. Credit: Aladin at SIMBAD.

Students start from a specific observational situation, notice changes, and calculate what's happening.


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Evaluation

evaluation activity

An astronomical radio source is detected on January 3, 2004. Over a period of 10 hours (hrs) of observation the detector records 1,000 counts (cts). The source's position is RA 10h 10m 10s Dec -10° 10' 10". Its distance is 3 AU.

Problem 1[edit]

One month later an observer looks in the same location and the source is gone. Changing telescope orientation, the observer believes she's found the same source at RA 10h 10m 50s Dec -10° 10' 50". The distance to the source is still 3 AU. Over a period of 10 hrs the detector records 2,000 cts radio and 1,000 cts of submillimeter photons.

How many km has the apparent source moved?

If this second radio source is not the same as the first, what type of source is it?

If this second source is the same as the first how fast was it going?

What is the change in radio output?

Problem 2[edit]

Another month goes by before the observer can use the telescope and its detector. Of course, the source is not at either earlier position. She believes she's located it again at RA 10h 11m 50s Dec -10° 10' 50". The distance to the source is still 3 AU. Over a period of 5 hrs of observation the detector records 3,000 cts of radio, 2,000 cts of submillimeter, and 1,000 cts of infrared.

How many km has it moved?

How fast was it going between position 2 and now?

What is its acceleration?

What is its radio output?

What is the acceleration in the radio output?

If the acceleration between position 2 and now occurred over the distance traveled, what is the source's energy phantom?

In terms of total photon output what is the source's acceleration in photon counts?

If this acceleration in total photon counts occurred over the entire time between position 2 and now, what is the source's photon phantom?

Problem 3[edit]

Power is said to be the rate of change of energy. The rate of change of a phantom may be called a power phantom.

Once again the observer has been given access to the telescope and its detector. She believes the source is now at RA 10h 13m 50s Dec -10° 11' 50".

The distance to the source is still 3 AU. Over a period of 3 hrs of observation the detector records 3,000 cts of radio, 2,000 cts of submillimeter, 1,000 cts of infrared, and 500 cts of red.

Fortunately, a new particle counter is online, it records 200 electrons and 50 protons from the source during the same period.

Between position 3 and now,

How many km has it moved?

How fast was it going between position 3 and now?

What is its acceleration?

What is its spectral output?

What is the acceleration in the spectral output?

If the acceleration between position 3 and now occurred over the distance traveled, what is the source's energy phantom?

In terms of total photon output what is the source's acceleration in photon counts?

If this acceleration in total photon counts occurred over the entire time between position 3 and now, what is the source's photon phantom?

Using the changes in energy and photon phantoms what are the respective power phantoms.

If at position 1 and position 3 the source is the same source, but not at position 2, what kind of source is it?

What current was received from the source during the observation period?

If the resistance between the detector and the source is 15 ohms, what is the voltage between the two?

Problem 4[edit]

Power is said to be the rate of change of energy. The rate of change of a phantom may be called a power phantom.

What would a change of power be called?

Again the observer has been given access to the telescope and its detector. She believes the source is now at RA 10h 15m 50s Dec -10° 11' 55".

The distance to the source is still 3 AU. Over a period of 7 hrs of observation the detector records 12,000 cts of radio, 5,000 cts of submillimeter, 4,000 cts of infrared, 2,500 cts of red, and 4,000 cts of orange.

Fortunately, a new particle counter is online, it records 400 electrons, 20 positrons, and 250 protons from the source during the same period.

Between position 4 and now,

How many km has it moved?

How fast was it going between position 4 and now?

What is its acceleration?

What is its spectral output?

What is the acceleration in the spectral output?

If the acceleration between position 4 and now occurred over the distance traveled, what is the source's energy phantom?

In terms of total photon output what is the source's acceleration in photon counts?

If this acceleration in total photon counts occurred over the entire time between position 4 and now, what is the source's photon phantom?

Using the changes in energy and photon phantoms what are the respective power phantoms.

If at position 1 and position 4 the source is the same source, but not at positions 2 or 3, what kind of source is it?

What current was received from the source during the observation period?

If the resistance between the detector and the source has changed to 35 ohms, what is the voltage between the two?

What are the current, voltage, and resistance changes?

What are the changes in the power phantoms?

Hypotheses[edit]

  1. Power phantoms become real when what is measured results from an electromagnetic type universal interaction.

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

{{Astronomy resources}}{{Charge ontology}}{{Flight resouces}}

{{Repellor vehicle}}{{Technology resources}}