Liquid water on Europa

From Wikiversity
Jump to: navigation, search
Two possible models of the interior of Europa

Jupiter's moon Europa probably contains liquid water. The laws of electromagnetism stipulate that a varying magnetic field induces a magnetic field if the body withing the varying field is conductive. Europa is within Jupiter's magnetic field and the Galileo probe's measurements of Europa's induced magnetic field suggest there is a global conductive layer near the icy surface. The best possibility to explain this would be a below surface salty ocean.[1]

Discovery[edit]

  • Discovered by: G. Galilei
    Galileo Galilei, the person who discovered Europa, one of Jupiter's moons
  • S. Marius
  • Discovery date: January 7, 1610

Orbital characteristics[edit]

  • Epoch January 8, 2004
  • Periapsis: 664862 km
  • Apoapsis: 676938 km
  • Mean radius of orbit: 670,900 km
  • Eccentricity: 0.009
  • Orbital period: 3.551181 d
  • Avg. orbital speed: 13.740 km/s
  • Inclination: 0.470° (to Jupiter's equator)
  • Satellite of: Jupiter

Physical characteristics[edit]

  • Mean radius: 1,569 km (0.245 Earths)
  • Surface area: 3.09×107 km² (0.061 Earths)
  • Volume: 1.593×1010 km³ (0.015 Earths)
  • Mass: 4.80×1022 kg (0.008 Earths)
  • Mean density: 3.01 g/cm³
  • Equatorial surface gravity: 1.314 m/s² (0.134 g)
  • Escape velocity: 2.025 km/s
  • Rotation period: Synchronous
  • Axial tilt: 0.1°
  • Albedo: 0.67 ± 0.03
  • Surface temp: 50 K~125K
  • Apparent magnitude: 5.29 (opposition)

Atmosphere[edit]

  • Surface pressure: 1 µPa

References[edit]

  1. http://web.archive.org/web/20040227211454/http://www.space.com/searchforlife/seti_phillips_europa_040226.html

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

{{Astronomy resources}}