Intensity astronomy/Quiz

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This gamma-ray spectrum contains the typical isotopes of the uranium-radium decay line. Credit: Wusel007.

Intensity astronomy is a lecture. It is an offering from the radiation astronomy department. Although under development, it may eventually be used as a lecture in the advanced undergraduate course principles of radiation astronomy.

You are free to take this quiz based on intensity astronomy at any time.

To improve your scores, read and study the lecture, the links contained within, listed under See also, External links, and in the {{radiation astronomy resources}} template. This should give you adequate background to get 100 %.

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Enjoy learning by doing!

Quiz[edit]

  

1 Yes or No, A time-averaged flux is called an intensity.

Yes
No

2 True or False, Intensity astronomy focuses on creating a sufficient intensity for a desired property or characteristic that a signal may be converted in a detector to an electric current.

TRUE
FALSE

3 Which of the following are theoretical radiation astronomy phenomena associated with a satellite in orbit around the Earth?

background radiation
a charged particle wind which emanates out of a beam line
gravity
near the barycenter for the Earth-Moon system
swirls of tan, green, blue, and white in the water
electric arcs
intensity of radiation

4 Yes or No, Visually dark infrared sources can be radiative cosmic dust, hydrogen gas such as an H II region (e.g. the Orion Nebula), an H I region of hydrogen, a molecular cloud, or a coronal cloud.

Yes
No

5 A cosmic ray may originate from what astronomical source?

Jupiter
the solar wind
the diffuse X-ray background
Mount Redoubt in Alaska
the asteroid belt
an active galactic nucleus

6 True or False, Each element has electronic orbitals of characteristic energy.

TRUE
FALSE

7 Complete the text:

Cosmic rays with energies over the

energy of 5 x 1019

interact with

photons to produce

via the resonance.

8 Complete the text:

A proof-of-concept structure, including a control group, consists of

, procedures, findings, and

.

9 Which of the following are cold dark matter gamma rays?

expected signal comparable to background
annihilation radiation
a pronounced cosmic-ray halo
difficult to separate from a dark halo
dwarf spheroidals
weakly interacting massless particles

10 Which of the following are likely associated with the intensity of a green emission line?

rocky objects
high peak to background
plasma objects
a G2V photosphere
rotation
watery surface
spots


Hypotheses[edit]

  1. Intensity-based questions may require extensive facility with detectors.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

{{Radiation astronomy resources}}Template:Sources resource