Draft:Universal English pronunciation

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Universal English pronunciation is the use of the English alphabet to describe the phonemes needed to pronounce any word, term, sign or expression from any other language. A similar pronunciation guide may be generated for any language.

An example is Ophiuchi, pronounced ‘oh-fee-yoo-ki’. No mysterious symbols from specialty fields are needed.

Languages or forms of communication exist which use sounds or apparent noises to convey meaning to those aware.

These can be represented by letters of the alphabet plus punctuation. K! conveys a quick and abrupt Kay sound for instance.

An audible record from a native speaker, plus appropriate visual or anatomical images may help others pronounce the sound.

Notations[edit]

  • noʊˈteɪʃən United States,[1]

For a universal english pronunciation, there are "yes" and "no".

The root crop is a po-ta-to (potato), as in "Tate". So is the second syllable "ta" without "te".

If you "shun" someone, they may find it hard to like you. The third syllable is "shuns".

"Notations" is pronounced "no"-"ta"-"shuns".

Universals[edit]

The word "universal" has a pronunciation guide

  • ˌjuːnɪˈvɜːsl United Kingdom,[2]
  • ˌjuːnɪˈvɜːrsl United States,[2]

or

  • ˌyoōnəˈvərsəl,

but an unfamiliarity with these symbols prevents knowing pronunciation. Using more familiar words like "you" ("n" as in "new" and "i" as in "fig" gives "ni") "v" with "er" for "ver" "sl" yields "u-ni-ver-sal". Or, ending with "sls" yields "u-ni-ver-sals".

For accent, breaking the word in two: "uni" "versal" approximates the accent on "ni" as "uni'versal".

Alphabets[edit]

Majuscule forms (also called uppercase or capital letters)
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Minuscule forms (also called lowercase or small letters)
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

Phones[edit]

Def. a "speech segment that possesses distinct physical or perceptual properties, considered as a physical event without regard to its place in the phonology of a language"[3] is called a phone.

Phonemes[edit]

Def. an "indivisible unit of sound in a [given] language"[4] or "an abstraction of the physical speech sounds (phones) [that] may encompass several different phones"[5] is called a phoneme.

Theoretical universal English pronunciation[edit]

Here's a theoretical definition:

Def. a collection of English phones or Midwestern American English phones ordered in forward time to speak the ordered phones of any spoken language within normal human hearing is called theoretical universal English pronunciation.

Variations of English spoken anywhere can also be so represented.

For example, schedule can be pronounced sk as in sky with ed as in Ed or sked you ul as in bull, or shed you ul.

Norwegian in English[edit]

Norwegian language is Norsk språk or Norsk with stalk changed to spralk. The l is silent.

The Norwegian word for the month January, Januar, is pronounced .

The Norwegian word for the month February, Februar, is pronounced .

The Norwegian word for the month March, Mars, is pronounced similar to the English word marsh, because rs is pronounced sh as in show.

The Norwegian word for the month April, April, is pronounced .

The Norwegian word for the month May, Mai, is pronounced .

The Norwegian word for the month June, Juni, is pronounced .

The Norwegian word for the month July, Juli, is pronounced .

The Norwegian word for the month August, August, is pronounced .

The Norwegian word for the month September, September, is pronounced .

The Norwegian word for the month October, Oktober, is pronounced .

The Norwegian word for the month November, November, is pronounced .

The Norwegian word for the month December, Desember, is pronounced .

Ø; Ø makes a sound similar to the o in the English come or the u in yum.

Æ makes a sound similar to the a in the English am.

Å; Å makes a sound similar to the a in the English stalk.

KJ; the Norwegian verb for driving, kjøre, is pronounced chyure.

Hypotheses[edit]

  1. Using English words, language sounds can be approximately represented.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Ultimateria (13 August 2013). "notation, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2016-07-10.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "universal, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. November 22, 2013. Retrieved 2013-12-04.
  3. Cynewulf (14 January 2007). "phone, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2016-07-24.
  4. Emperorbma (9 November 2003). "phoneme, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2016-07-24.
  5. Bequw (25 January 2008). "phoneme, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2016-07-24.

External links[edit]

{{Linguistics resources}}