Draft:Safety

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For these Hopi snake dancers in 1897 at Walpi, Arizona, safety is a matter of practice and skill. Credit: A. C. Froman.

Safety is the "condition or feeling of being safe".[1]

Just about any endeavor can be performed safely.

Safeness[edit]

Def.

  1. not "in danger; free from harm's reach",[2]
  2. free "from risk; harmless; riskless",[2]
  3. providing "protection from danger; providing shelter",[2] or
  4. not "in danger from the specified source of harm"[2]

is called safe.

Practical safety[edit]

This is an Arizona poisonous snake warning sign. Credit: Matt Frederick.

Practical Safety can be defined as "anything done to prevent accidents or reduce their effects". It is generally a subject with much unnecessary confusion. Essentially, safety breaks down into 2 major categories:

Safety Technology: engineering solutions designed to eliminate / reduce hazards.

Safety Behaviour: defined safe actions used in conjunction with safety technology.

In order to control the design / input and to sustain both categories (voluntarily) Safety Management (application of management technques to control safety technology / behaviour) is necessary. The accepted world standard in this area is OHSAS18001. Templates are available to assist users in this endeavour, eg ISA2000. These can be certified by internationally recognized management systems certification organizations, eg ICS.

Safety Law: Statutory measures to enforce the above measures apply in most countries eg OHSA in the USA and EU law in Europe. Employers failing to adopt adequate safety management measures are liable to be prosecuted with resultant fines and possible imprisonment. Employers who do adopt such measures are likely to achieve significant savings in many areas of operation making them more competitive than their counterparts.

The snake and scorpion sign on the right from Arizona USA is a form of safety management.

Safety calls[edit]

Def. a "prescheduled phone call to another person who knows where one is and who one was going out with, [where a] missed check-in (or using a pre-arranged code phrase for danger) signals one's contact person to call for help"[3] is called a safety call.

Safety belts[edit]

A woman has buckled a 3-point seat belt. Credit: State Farm.

Def. a "belt or strap that attaches a person to an immovable object for safety"[4] is called a safety belt.

Safety catches[edit]

Def. a "latching device that prevents accidental activation of a dangerous event; an interlock"[5] is called a safety catch.

Safety factors[edit]

Def. a "ratio of the maximum stress or load which something can withstand to the stress or load which it was designed to withstand under normal operation"[6] is called a safety factor.

Safety glasses[edit]

Safety glasses are shown with side shields. Credit: Glenn McKechnie.

Def. glasses "(spectacles) designed to protect the eyes against flying objects such as dust etc"[7] are called safety glasses.

Safety helmets[edit]

Worker wears a face shield, a helmet, Tyvek coveralls, gloves, and earplugs while decontaminating a containment boom. Credit: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Def. any "helmet designed to protect the head from accidental injury, such as a bicycle helmet or construction helmet"[8] is called a safety helmet.

Safety matches[edit]

Household safety matches are shown. Credit: StoatBringer.

Def. a "match designed so it can only be ignited on a special friction surface"[9] is called a safety match.

Safety nets[edit]

A safety net is stretcheed over a roadway to protect cars during overhead cable replacement. Credit: John M.

Def.

  1. a "large net placed horizontally beneath performing aerialists such as trapeze artists or tightrope walkers, intended to catch a performer who falls and to protect him or her from harm"[10] or
  2. anything, "such as a governmental program, that provides security against extreme disadvantage or misfortune"[11]

is called a safety net.

Safety pins[edit]

The image shows a safety pin open (top) for use and closed (bottom) to pin and prevent harm. Credit: Haragayato.{{free media}}

Def.

  1. "a pin, in the form of a clasp, that has a guard to cover the sharp point; used to join two pieces of fabric etc together temporarily"[12] and
  2. "the pin of a hand grenade that prevents accidental detonation"[12]

is called a safety pin.

Safety razors[edit]

A selection of low-cost safety razors is here. Credit: Henning Becker.

Def. a "razor, designed for safety, that protects the skin from all but the very edge of the blade (as opposed to a straight razor)"[13] is called a safety razor.

Safety valves[edit]

An oxygen safety relief valve is near center. Credit: Rasi57.

Def. a "relief valve set to open at a pressure below that at which a container (such as a boiler) would burst"[14] is called a safety valve.

Security[edit]

Def.

  1. a "condition of not being threatened, especially physically, psychologically, emotionally, or financially"[15] or
  2. freedom "from apprehension"[15]

is called security.

Risks[edit]

Def. a "likelihood of a negative [such as an unhealthy] outcome"[16] is called a risk.

Evaluating a risk may mean assigning a probability of an unhealthy occurrence, e.g., an experimental repellor vehicle 10 km above the Earth's surface with only one repellor system may have a higher probability of crashing back to the ground than another with quadruple independent systems available to repel the Earth.

Hypotheses[edit]

  1. Safety is conducting an experiment using 3300 coulombs in a capacitor and suffering no harm or radiation poisoning.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. Dvortygirl (6 July 2005). "safety, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2013-09-30.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 "safe, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. August 28, 2013. Retrieved 2013-09-30.
  3. Robin Lionheart (15 November 2011). "safety call, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  4. SemperBlotto (21 February 2006). "safety belt, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  5. RJFJR (12 October 2007). "safety catch, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  6. SemperBlotto (30 January 2007). "safety factor, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  7. Donnanz (5 September 2016). safety glasses. San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  8. Equinox (19 November 2008). "safety helmet, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  9. Logomaniac (9 July 2009). safety match. San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  10. Silent Sam (25 July 2011). "safety net, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  11. Logomaniac (9 July 2009). "safety net, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  12. 12.0 12.1 SemperBlotto (21 February 2006). "safety pin, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  13. Equinox (24 June 2009). "safety razor, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  14. SemperBlotto (12 August 2006). "safety valve, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2017-11-16.
  15. 15.0 15.1 "security, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. June 7, 2014. Retrieved 2014-07-05.
  16. "risk, In: Wiktionary". San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2014-07-05.

External links[edit]

{{Radiation astronomy resources}}{{Physics resources}}{{Repellor vehicle}}