Draft:Animal physiology

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This is a generalized trout anatomy. Credit: ScientificFishing.com.

Physiology has traditionally been divided into plant physiology and animal physiology but the principles of physiology are universal, no matter what particular organism is being studied. For example, what is learned about the physiology of yeast cells can also apply to human cells.

Physiology[edit]

Physiology is the study of the mechanical, physical, and biochemical functions of living organisms.

Def. a "branch of biology that deals with the functions and activities of life or of living matter (as organs, tissues, or cells) and of the physical and chemical phenomena involved"[1] is called a physiology.

Physiology is the scientific study of the functions and mechanisms which work within a living system.[2][3]

As a sub-discipline of biology, the focus of physiology is in how organisms, organ systems, organs, cells, and biomolecules carry out the chemical and physical functions that exist in a living system.[4]

Animals[edit]

The elaborate patterns on the wings of butterflies are one example of bilateral symmetry. Credit: Carpaltnl.

Animals are heterotrophic eukaryotic organisms which ingest food.

Def. "a multicellular organism that is usually mobile, whose cells are not encased in a rigid cell wall (distinguishing it from plants and fungi) and which derives energy solely from the consumption of other organisms"[5] is called an animal.

Theoretical animal physiology[edit]

Here's a theoretical definition:

Def. a branch of zoology that deals with the functions and activities of single or multicellular organisms that are usually mobile, whose cells are not encased in a rigid cell wall and which derive energy solely from the consumption of other organisms, and of the physical and chemical phenomena involved is called an animal physiology.

Functionings[edit]

Central to an understanding of physiological functioning is the investigation of the fundamental biophysical and biochemical phenomena, the coordinated homeostatic control mechanisms, and the continuous communication between cells.[6]

States[edit]

The physiologic state is the condition occurring per normal body function, while the pathologic state is centered on the abnormalities that occur in animal diseases, including humans.[7]

Types of organisms[edit]

According to the type of investigated organisms, the field can be divided into, animal physiology (including that of humans), plant physiology, cellular physiology and microbial physiology.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 62.252.224.13 (21 February 2005). physiology. San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2016-03-27.
  2. What is physiology? — Faculty of Biology. Retrieved 2018-07-07.
  3. Prosser, C. Ladd (1991). Comparative Animal Physiology, Environmental and Metabolic Animal Physiology (4th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Liss. pp. 1–12. ISBN 978-0-471-85767-9.
  4. 4.0 4.1 Hall, John (2011). Guyton and Hall textbook of medical physiology (12th ed.). Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders/Elsevier. p. 3. ISBN 978-1-4160-4574-8.
  5. 130.88.96.66 (21 April 2003). animal. San Francisco, California: Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. Retrieved 2016-03-27.
  6. Widmaier, Eric P.; Raff, Hershel; Strang, Kevin T. (2016). Vander's Human Physiology The Mechanisms of Body Function. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Education. pp. 14–15. ISBN 978-1-259-29409-9.
  7. What is physiology? In: Medical News Today.

External links[edit]