Controversies in Science/Was there a mitochondrial Eve?/a critique of Human demographic history: refining the recent African origin model

From Wikiversity
Jump to navigation Jump to search

(Review Paper) Cited in Controversies in Science/Was there a mitochondrial Eve?/a critique of Human demographic history: refining the recent African origin model

Points Made[edit]

We are not diverse enough to have come from different origins[1].

It is true that relatively speaking genetic diversity between humans is very small but this knowledge alone is not enough to support a mitochondrial eve. We are hybrids of many different breeds of humans that have existed over the last couple million years. Our genomes are so similar because we bred with species that already had very similar DNA to us.
The diversity of us human is basically not enough points to make one understand that we are from one person back millions of years ago. We should be looking for traits that are similar and the way the human mind work as well as how the generation expands.Bomor394 (talk) 02:48, 28 March 2012 (UTC)

Pdres507 (talk) 01:53, 28 March 2012 (UTC)

Of course we are diverse enough! The skulls found at various locations around the world prove that diversity is present. These skulls undeniably show the physical mutations from generation to generation, thus proving that we are diverse and originate from different origins.Jdzur290 (talk) 02:22, 28 March 2012 (UTC)

Methods[edit]

They used Templeton’s method which is the nested clade analysis (NCA) framework. This method studied the genetic diversity of different human populations by examining their mtDNA, X Y chromosomes, autosomal regions and regular genes[1].

The study takes far too many assumptions and liberties to create the results. The model is inefficient because there is too little data to make an accurate finding. The theory is not proven as there is not enough scientific proof.Tlouc287 (talk) 17:06, 13 April 2012 (UTC)

Results[edit]

Due to the restricted nature of the genes examined in Templeton's method, the study concluded that these genes (β-globin [29], MC1R [68], MS205) came from the same geographical region/origin and later branched out to other regions. Humans from Europe, Asia and Africa are all found to have these three genes in common which originated in Africa and were found to link together 52-66 thousand years ago. Therefore, before this linkage point, all humans must have originated from Africa[1].

References[edit]

<references> http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959437X02003507

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Excoffier, L. (2002) Human demographic history: refining the recent African origin model. Current opinion in genetics & development (0959-437X), 12 (6), 675. DOI: 10.1016/S0959-437X(02)00350-7 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959437X02003507