Web Science/Flipped Classroom

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Starting on October 29th every Tuesday and Thursday at 4:15 pm CET there will be live streamed flipped classroom sessions via Google Hangouts/YouTube.

More information on how to join the stream will be available soon at this page.

so you won't miss updates.

this graphic advertises the web science mooc

October 24th: Offline session with local students from Koblenz[edit]

http://etherpad.wikimedia.org/p/websciencemooc


October 29th: Ethernet[edit]

In order to join the flipped classroom session you should have prepared our lesson on Ethernet.

Video
and script
Associated Lesson
Communication over a shared Medium
Ethernet Header
Minimum Package length vs Maximum cable length
Collision Detection
no video Summary, Further readings & Homework

The following video of the flipped classroom associated with this topic are available:

You can find more information on wiki commons and also directly download this file


October 31st: Internet Protocol:[edit]

Script error


November 5th: Transmission Control Protocol[edit]

Script error


Video
and script
Associated Lesson
End to End Principle and Connection oriented Communication
3 way handshake
Port Numbers
Sliding Window and Flow Control
no video Summary, Further readings, Homework

The following video of the flipped classroom associated with this topic are available:

You can find more information on wiki commons and also directly download this file


November 7th: The domain name system[edit]

In order to join the flipped classroom session you should have prepared our lesson on Domain Name System


November 12th: Internet vs World Wide Web[edit]

In order to join the flipped classroom session you should have prepared our Internet vs World Wide Web Script error


Video
and script
Associated Lesson
Summary of the Internet Architecture
Motivation and Requirements for the World wide web
Design Principles of the Web
Uniform Resource Identifier (URI)
no video available Summary, Further readings, Homework

The following video of the flipped classroom associated with this topic are available:

You can find more information on wiki commons and also directly download this file


November 14th: Hypertext Transfer Protocol[edit]

In order to join the flipped classroom session you should have prepared our Hypertext Transfer Procotol Script error


Video
and script
Associated Lesson
Making HTTP requests
A Simple Web Client
A Simple Web Server
The HTTP Header
Content negotiation
Summary, Further readings, Homework

The following video of the flipped classroom associated with this topic are available:

You can find more information on wiki commons and also directly download this file


November 26th: Webcontent[edit]

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  • Wget script (Linux) to download all the videos of this part.
Video
and script
Associated Lesson Further resources Description
Problem Setting for Web Content Formats In this lesson you will learn some basics on the Question: Why Web Content needs structure and proper markup.
Working with XML
  • Understand the Domain Object Model and the DOM tree
  • Understand that HTML is just a special dialect of XML
  • Understand the relationship between HTML and XML
HTML for Web Document Structures
  • Be able to write simple HTML code having learned a few example elements of HTML (headings, paragraphs, lists, tables, links, anchors, emphasize, input fields; but also few dirty ones like italics, color,...)
  • See that HTML really is just another simple mark up and has nothing to do with programming
  • Be able to structure web Content using HTML and create pages following a specified structure.
Layout Elements in HTML
  • Know about the style attribute and how to use it within HTML elements
  • Know already realize that there are some limits using the style attribute
  • be able to create websites that follow a certain style guide
Motivating Separation of Content and Layout
  • See the problems with inline styles
  • Understand that a style sheet gives you freedom
  • being able to explain people why they should use style sheets
Cascading Stylesheets (CSS)
  • be able to name at least 2 important point why to use style sheets
  • know how the cascading process works
  • know the basic syntax of cascading stylesheets
Media Content
  • know how to include a media file like a graphic to your webpage.
  • understand that images like jpg, gif and bitmaps are hard for machines to understand.
  • Know how to use a XML based format to create images that are easy to understand for machines and humans an can even make use of stylesheets.
Metadata
  • Understand that metadata is necessary to communicate the semantics of content
  • See that using metadata for ranking in search results is a bad idea
  • get introduced to modern ways of publishing media data as RDFa
no video Summary, Further readings & Homework
  • Understand the separation between content, structure, layout and meta data
  • Review HTML, CSS, XML, SVG and RDFa
  • Understand what makes a clean HTML markup ("separation of concerns") vs. unclean one ("mixing responsibilities"); and implications (better or worse maintenance, better or worse personalization, better or worse accessibility)

The following video of the flipped classroom associated with this topic are available:

You can find more information on wiki commons and also directly download this file


November 28th: Dynamic Webcontent[edit]

Script error


Video
and script
Associated Lesson Further resources Description
Problemsetting for working with Dynamic Web Content and software setup.
Basics of server side web programming
  • become aware of the possibilities to create dynamic content within a webserver
  • see that you don't have to implement a webserver to be able to serve dynamic content
  • understand some main issues like blocking I/O that one should keep in mind when doing server side programming
  • see how the web server is the entry point for web applications
  • whitelisting of input vs blacklisting and a method of preventing XSS
Creating a simple Webform and preparing a POST request.
Web Forms and HTTP Post Request
  • understand the basics of HTTP POST requests
  • become aware of security issues while transfering data to a web server
  • be able to create a simple web form in HTML
Handling a Post Request on a Web Server
Handling the Post Request in a Java servlet
  • See how a POST request is handled in a Java Servlet
  • get to know the Request object
  • see how a data base query and more advanced technology can be included to a servlet
Using Client side Java script to support Users filling out a web form
Client side JavaScript
  • understand how javascript was supposed to support people to fill out web forms
  • understand the issues and disadvantages that arise with javascript
Using server side application logic and client side ajax requests to support Users filling out a web form
Ajax and the XMLHttpRequest Class
  • be aware of JavaScript APIs
  • know some of the standard JavaScript libraries
  • be able to understand the concept of Ajax requests.
Lesson summary
Summary, Further readings, Homework
  • Web Content has a dynamic nature. This can happen on the client and on the server.
  • The web is an interactive medium. It can enable to make consumers of content also to become producers (Web 2.0)
  • The ratio of consumers to producers is like 90 to 10.
  • Be able to name some basic web technologies like javascript, and serverside programming tools and web servers.


The following video of the flipped classroom associated with this topic are available:

You can find more information on wiki commons and also directly download this file


December 3rd: Structure of the Web I[edit]

December 5th: Structure of the Web II[edit]

December 10th: Search Engine Economy I[edit]

December 12th: Search Engine Economy II[edit]


December 17th: Ranking and Recommendations[edit]

December 19th: Spreading Memes[edit]

January 9th: User Modelling and Recommendations[edit]

January 14th: Collective Intelligence[edit]

January 16th: Recommendations[edit]


January 21rst:[edit]

January 23rd: Copyright[edit]


January 28th: Net Neutrality[edit]

January 30th: Trust[edit]


February 4th: Internet Governance[edit]