Talk:Instructional design/Affective behaviors

From Wikiversity
Jump to: navigation, search

Design Document[edit]

The following describes the design driving this instructional module. Phonebein

A (for Affective) design team,
I have done some minor editing in the Lesson One Prototype and think we should structure other activities/lessons similarly.

Lesson Objective:

Interim Objectives:

Introduction and Lesson Organizer

Learning Resources

Task

Key Points/Lesson Summary

Assessment

Cheers, Brent --Jonesbre 11:07, 10 March 2007 (UTC)

Target Audience[edit]

  • Individuals studying or practicing instructional design
  • Age: Adult
  • Individuals interested in learning more about:
    • the affective domain and affective learning outcomes
    • strategies and/or methods useful in designing instruction to elicit specific affective outcomes
    • evaluating and/or critiquing instructional effectiveness
  • Individuals interested in developing skills in the following areas:
    • designing instruction when presented with a topic and affective domain objectives
    • selecting effective and efficient micro strategies to elicit specific affective domain outcomes
  • Individuals with at least general understanding of the ID field and component sub-fields
  • Individuals with at least basic familiarity with common ID terminology, models and processes
  • Practical-minded individuals who are able to think critically.

Course Goal[edit]

Trainers or instructional designers will develop a rich toolbox of affective methods and strategies and be able to apply those methods and strategies to develop affective behaviors in learners. Additionally, trainers or instructional designers will be able to critique and defend the application of affective instructional methods and strategies. The result shall be instruction that is effective, efficient, and appealing.

Learning Objectives[edit]

  • Given an interpersonal skill, the learner will be able to generate a micro-level instructional strategy that teaches the interpersonal skill.
  • Given a design document, evaluate whether or not the strategies and methods within the document meet the affective needs of the particular course.
  • Given a list of instructional strategies and methods, associate them in a diagram with the different elements of the affective domain and taxonomy.
  • After observing an example that teaches an affective behavior, evaluate how well the instructional strategies and methods used meet the apparent objectives.
  • Presented with a context (conditions), target outcome(s) and instructional micro strategy (methods), learners will demonstrate the ability to write a critique of the selected micro strategy.
  • Learners will develop an appreciation for affective strategies by exploring their own learning experiences and identifying the presence or absence of affective considerations in their experiences

Learning Experience[edit]

Describe the learning experience and how it will achieve the goal and objectives.

Discussion[edit]

Team, I have taken Laurie's draft of the design document and other work, edited things, and moved it above into our wiki design document template. I suggest from now on all we do is edit what is above as the project moves forward. Look over the design document as it stands above and edit/elaborate as appropriate. Your next task is to develop a prototype lesson for one of the enabling objectives. Someone should take the lead on starting the lesson, with others contributing and elaborating. Ultimately, for fairness, each one of you should take the lead on designing a lesson for the other enabling objectives. Let's try to keep the work and deliverables focused within the wikiversity environment, since that is the key part of our grand experiment. In other words, avoid MS Word documents, etc. and posting them -- let's experiment and figure out how to do the similar create and edit tasks in the wiki environment. Phonebein 20:31, 27 February 2007 (UTC)

Thank you! Lkirkner 17:49, 1 March 2007 (UTC)

You might find this reference helpful: Krathwohl et al (1964), Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Book 2: Affective Domain. See Taxonomy Phonebein 22:53, 14 February 2007 (UTC)

Also for discussion:

I know we've tossed around some objectives, how do we want to go about agreeing/narrowing/etc?

Also, from Morrison, Ross and Kemp (p. 7), here are the elements to an instructional design plan, I thought they might be helpful, especially for the "design decisions" section:

1. Identify instructional problems and specify goals for creating instruction

2. examine learner characteristics

3. Identify subject content and analyze task components related to stated goals and purposes

4. specify the instructional objectives

5. sequence content within each instructional unit for logical learning

6. design instructional strategies so that each learner can master the objectives

7. plan the instructional message and devlop the instruction

8. develop evaluation instruments

9. select resources to support instruction.

Chrisie 14:00, 23 February 2007 (UTC)


Design Document Outline[edit]

To get us started on the design document, I suggest the following outline. Please offer any suggestions you have for improvement.

Introduction This should include our collective understanding of what it is we are attempting to do and how this will fit with what the others are doing.

Analysis Here we can include our proposed objectives for the module as well as a review of relevent literature.

Design Decisions This section can be used for both macro (page) and micro (activity) level guidelines. We should also discuss evaluation issues.

Next Steps Here we can get down to specifics and maybe include the division of labor we decide upon.

Conclusion

Lesson One Prototype[edit]

TEAM: I moved this lesson over to the main page, I figured we could continue editing there. Chrisie 14:38, 26 March 2007 (UTC)


Intro/grabber

File:Frustrated.jpg
Emotion plays a part in every learner’s experience.
Eliciting desired emotional responses takes great planning.


Welcome to the affective domain module! "The affective domain describes the way people react emotionally and their ability to feel another living thing's pain or joy. Affective objectives typically target the awareness and growth in attitudes, emotion, and feelings" (wiki aricle: Taxonomy of Instructional Objectives).

Before we delve into what that definition means, let's take a look at this video.

The video teaches a very simple concept: the proper way to cough. The message is also simple: cough into your clothing and not into your hand. The video likely could have gotten its point across in only a few seconds. Why then is the video over five minutes long?

The answer to this lies in the true objective of the video. One might at first assume the objective of the video to be psychomotor in nature, and indeed, the video does want to change your physical behavior. The video however, reveals a deeper objective in the first few seconds when is states "The purpose of this video is to make coughing into one's sleeve fashionable". The video wants to change your attitude or belief toward coughing. This places the objective squarely in the affective domain.

Chrisie 19:51, 16 March 2007 (UTC)

  • move on to Recollection of prior experience


Lesson Objective: In this lesson, you will learn what the affective domain is and how if can affect learning. At the end of this lesson, you should be able to identify situations calling for an affective strategy by recalling prior experiences and identifying the presence or absence of affective considerations in those experiences.

Interim Objectives:

  • Learners will be able to differentiate between the affective domain and other domains
  • Learners will recall personal learning experiences and identify the affective components
  • Learners will examine new situations to determine the affective considerations

Introduction and Lesson Organizer

  • There are five major categories to the affective domain (from http://itc.utk.edu/~jklittle/edsmrt521/affective.html):
    • Receiving (Here's a link to the "Bueller" video we talked about on the call) Chrisie 20:18, 13 March 2007 (UTC)
    • Responding (Shall We Dance a link to a seen from the movie where Richard Gere's character responds well to what he's learned. Lance 03:51, 21 March 2007 (UTC)
    • Valuing - here is an example of valuing. Homer Simpson quickly reaches the valuing stage.
Homer: Aw, twenty dollars! I wanted a peanut!
Homer's Brain: Twenty dollars can buy many peanuts!
Homer: Explain how!
Homer's Brain: Money can be exchanged for goods and services!
Homer: Woo-hoo!

Lance 03:51, 21 March 2007 (UTC)

    • Organization
    • Value or Value Complex (Characterization)

Taking a stab at this, please feel free to correct/edit as necessary (I may not be 100% clear on all stages) Chrisie 18:10, 19 March 2007 (UTC)

Let's take a look at each of these stages with respect to the video from the beginning of the lesson.

Receiving is being open to the information; you haven't yet made any decisions at this stage, but you've agreed to at least receive the information. In our example, merely watching the video satisfies the receiving stage.

Responding is actively participating in the information. If the video had included tasks or an assessment and you had completed them, you would be satisfying the requirements of responding.

Valuing is attaching worth to the ideas presented. In our video example, if you had believed that the technique offered was worth considering and begun to think about implementing it in your everyday life, you have reached the valuing stage.

Organization is incorporating the new information into your existing schema. In the case of the video, this would include implementing the technique presented in your daily life.

Characterization occurs when you truly become an advocate of the new information. In the video example, this may mean telling others about the technique or finding some way to pass the information along to others.

Chrisie 18:10, 19 March 2007 (UTC)

Comparing the Affective Domain

Affective Cognitive Psychomotor Interpersonal
Receiving Knowledge Imitation Seeking/Giving Information
Responding Comprehension Manipulation Proposing
Valuing Application Precision Building and Supporting
Organization Analysis Articulation Shutting Out/Bringing In
Characterization Synthesis Naturalization Disagreeing
(none) Evaluation (none) Summarizing

Lance 03:55, 21 March 2007 (UTC)

"Learning Resources'

Expanding on the above description, the affective domain includes behaviors not covered by the cognitive, psychomotor and interpersonal domains. Namely, we are talking about values, attitudes, beliefs, feelings and emotions. Some examples of positive and negative affective learning outcomes include:

"Positive"

  • A teacher praises a young learner on the picture she is drawing. The child feels good about herself and is encouraged to challenge new areas.
  • A trainer uses a think-aloud protocol in explaining how to add animation to PowerPoint presentations. The trainee(s) recognizes the value of using this type mental checklist and decides to use this in the future.
  • An online interactive time line of women's history [1] Lkirkner 20:36, 17 March 2007 (UTC)
  • A video driven expose of Susan B. Anthony & Elizabeth Cady Statton [2] Lkirkner 20:36, 17 March 2007 (UTC)

"Negative"

  • A piano teacher slams her fist down on the piano and asks their pupil why they are so dense and talent-less. The pupil goes away feeling worthless and begins thinking of ways to get out of the next lesson.
  • A lecturer in an introductory philosophy class spends the first half of class reading from the assigned text without looking up. Half of the students are talking among themselves or text messaging on the mobile phones. The few learners who were interested in the topic begin to feel that registering for the class was a mistake.
  • A (boring) text-based time line of women's suffrage [3] Lkirkner 20:36, 17 March 2007 (UTC)

The following articles should help you toward a better understanding of affective domain as related to learning outcomes.

The survey instrument in this article will help you understand some of the dimensions of the affective domain.


Tasks

You, the learner, will think back on your own experiences and describe in a learning journal (online or paper based) one good learning experience and one bad one. Include in your discussion the affective outcomes (such as increased/decreased motivation, constructive or destructive anxiety, changes in self-confidence). You will also need to relate your own experiences to the concepts and discussion in articles from the Learning Resource section and other relevent readings of your own choosing. Finally, you should discuss the affective dimensions of your learning as you progressed through this activity.

Key Points/Lesson Summary (This needs some work) Effective instructional design for most contexts should include careful consideration of affective dimensions of the learning event. The following key points should help you in your future ID endeavors:
Effective Affective Instruction

  • realistic, relevant & stimulating
  • presents new information
  • persuasive in a credible manner
  • elicits emotional involvement for a purpose
  • involves learners in planning, production and/or delivery
  • allows for discussion or critique after lesson

Smith and Ragan (1999) focus on the behavioral aspect of attitude learning and emphasize the importance of three key instructional approaches:

  • demonstration of the desired behavior by a respected role model
  • practice of the desired behavior, often through role playing
  • reinforcement of the desired behavior

Adding Affective Components: most often less is better!
Miller, M . (2005). Learning and teaching in the affective domain. In M. Orey (Ed.), Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology. Available Website: http://www.coe.uga.edu/epltt/affective.htm.

Lkirkner 20:36, 17 March 2007 (UTC) Assessment

Assessment will be based on your demonstration of:

  • an advanced understanding of key concepts related to affective behavoirs
  • a synthesis of ideas from the various readings and your own personal experiences
  • the ability to deliniate effective and efficient instructional strategies from those that those that are not

Chrisie 19:35, 2 March 2007 (UTC)

Lesson Two Prototype[edit]

Hi Team, I wanted to include some notes regarding design decisions. This lesson is definitely a work in progress. Please jump in and add any suggestions for improvement.

First, I was working with the following objective.

"After observing an example that teaches an affective behavior, evaluate how well the instructional strategies and methods used meet the apparent objectives."

I was originally thinking of preparing a lesson based on personal stories/anecdotes. I was looking for an entry point and remembered the IST colloquia page. The Bonk lecture jumped out at me because of the discussion that came up regarding the value of the lecture as a mirco strategy. I decided then to change course and see if I could prepare a lesson that might bring about affective change in our classmates.

I didn't want to jump right in with the video, so I prepared a short survey about attitudes/beliefs related to lecturing. My thinking was that this would get learners/users to think about their own opinions/feelings regarding lectures. Please post any additional statements here or in oncourse and I will add them to the quia survey.

I also came across the Martin and Reigeluth paper in the green book and thought it contained some important considerations regarding design for the affective domain. At the same time, I liked the table that Chrisie included in her lesson and wanted to experiment. I do not have my heart set on including this table in my lesson if anyone on the team would like to move it to their lesson.

As for the task and assessment, I wanted to target Level 3 (Valuing) behavior in our learners. I liked the idea of contributing to a blog that we discussed in our telephone conference. I was hoping learners would be able to pick out at least three lecture strategies they liked and discuss the merits. I also brought back the idea of having learners share their stories/anecdotes. I know Prof. Honebein was thinking about having learners set up their own individual blogs, but I thought it would be neat to have one blog with a collection of stories.

I hope this gives you a better understanding of my thought process with this lesson. Again, I welcome any comments/suggestions.

Jonesbre 07:53, 2 April 2007 (UTC)


Oh no! Not another lecture

Introduction
How many hours of your life have you wasted in boring lectures? This lesson is offered as a critical look at this often overused (abused) instructional strategy. Before proceeding, take the Survey of Lecture Attitudes/Beliefs at quia.com (http://www.quia.com/sv/112182.html). You will need to enter the password “affect” to proceed.

Online Lecture
Now, take some time to watch a lecture by Curtis Bonk in the online colloquia archives
Distance Education: Instructional Systems Technology http://crlt.indiana.edu/video/ offered by the School of Education at Indiana University -

Go to the April 29, 2005 colloquia titled Hyper-Engaging Lectures: Low-Risk, Low-Cost, Low-Time by Curtis Bonk

Reading Assignment
Read the article by Martin and Reigeluth (1999) for a discussion of the controversies surrounding the affective domain as well as a useful conceptual model for considering the major components and dimensions of development in the affective domain.


DIMENSIONS Knowledge Skills Attitudes Others
Emotional Development Knowing that others experience the same emotions you do, such as joy and anger Recognizing emotions, Controlling ones emotions I want to be happy. I don't like to be angry. ?
Moral Development Understanding moral & ethical rules of the culture, such as caring, justice, equality Moral reasoning skills, Problem-solving skills in the realm of morals I want to be honest/ I am in favor of having ethical standards. ?
Social Development Understanding group dynamics and democratic ideals, such as the role of a facilitator Social skills, including inerpersonal communication skills I want to interact positively with others. I am opposed to resolving disagreements by fighting. ?
Spiritual Development Knowledge of religious precepts about the spiritual world, such as the nature of the soul Skills for getting in touch with your inner self, Ability to love others selflessly I want a spiritual life. I am in favor of prayer to build a relationship with God. ?
Aesthetic Development Understanding the subjective nature of aesthetics, such as the relationship between one's values and one's judgments Skills for assessing aesthetic qualities, Skills for generating aesthetic creations I want to surround myself with things of beauty. I appreciate an elegant theory. ?
Motivational Development Understanding internal and external rewards for sustained activity, such as joy and sense of accomplishment Skills for developing one's interests, both immediate and life-long I want a career that I enjoy. I am opposed to hobbies related to guns. ?

Table 1. Martin & Reigeluth (1999). Conceptual Model for Affective Development


Tasks

  1. Top Three - Select from the Bonk lecture the three strategies you believe are most effective in bringing about target behavior outcomes in the affective domain. Offer support for each of your choices in exactly 50 words. Post to the Stories from the Affective Domain blog.
  2. Go to the Stories from the Affective Domain blog and post a short description of one lecture you have received or given that was especially effective or ineffective as an instructional strategy in terms of eliciting behavior in the affective domain.
  3. Go to the Stories from the Affective Domain blog and comment on at least two other posts.

Assessment
You will be assessed by the level of understanding demonstrated in your arguments for the above tasks.

References
Martin, B. L. & Reigeluth, C. M. (1999). Affective education and the affective domain: Implications for instructional-design theories and models. In Reigeluth, C. M. (Ed). Instructional-design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theory (Vol II). Mahwah, New Jersey, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Jonesbre 01:10, 29 March 2007 (UTC)




Lesson 3 Prototype[edit]

Laurie, I would like to offer a few comments and suggestions about your lesson plan.
First, I like the idea of listing the specific micro strategies and having learners match these to specific affective outcomes. I was hoping that someone would do this.

I was a little confused by the meaning of "elements" in the objective and your lesson plan. Are we talking about the "levels" in Krathwohl's taxonomy? We should clarify this for the learners with a clear definition and/or examples. Without this support, I am afraid learners may have trouble completing the task.

The CloudNet link includes a few good examples but I also worry that there are too many unrelated links and a few dead links as well. Maybe we should link directly to the best 5 or 6 articles/sites.

The task (Compile your findings) seems reasonable. Having learners post this to the discussion area might work but we might think about setting up a blog for this like we are thinking about for Lesson 1 and 2. This would have the added benefit of making the learner feel more like a member of our community of learners.

I understand your intention in linking to the youtube of the sleepy student, but felt that it didn't add much to your overall lesson. To tell the truth, I was a little irritated by the first twenty or so seconds.

Let us know if there is anything we can do to help move this lesson along. We will try to help where needed.


Jonesbre 07:10, 2 April 2007 (UTC)

What methods best support affective elements? (working on title)

Lesson Goal: Given a list of instructional strategies and methods, associate them in a diagram with the different elements of the affective domain and taxonomy.

Lesson Introduction
As we begin looking at this objective, notice that two components are necessary for you to complete this task: the instructional strategies list and the affective domain elements. The task is to connect these components in a diagram of your choosing. To get started, you will need to clearly know & understand the elements of the affective domain, which are not provided for you here. Take some time to list these elements in a Word document with notes of important for each. As you identify and take notes, keep in mind the three components of each affective domain element; each element has a cognitive, an affective and a psychomotor component to it. Save this document and return to this lesson.

When you’ve completed this, consider taking a moment to reflect on the differences of each element; what are the overt and subtle differences and connections?

Affective Objective Terms for Each Element
It may help you to familiarize yourself with commonly used affective objectives. Consider visiting CloudNet at http://www.cloudnet.com/~edrbsass/affectiveeducation.html. This site breaks down objectives per the elements of the affective domain.

1. Receiving "refers to the learner's sensitivity to the existence of stimuli - awareness, willingness to receive, or selected attention."

  • feel
  • sense
  • capture
  • experience
  • pursue
  • attend
  • perceive

2. Responding "refers to the learners' active attention to stimuli and his/her motivation to learn - acquiescence, willing responses, or feelings of satisfaction."

  • conform
  • allow
  • cooperate
  • contribute
  • enjoy
  • satisfy

3. Valuing "refers to the learner's beliefs and attitudes of worth - acceptance, preference, or commitment. An acceptance, preference, or commitment to a value."

  • believe
  • seek
  • justify
  • respect
  • search
  • persuade

4. Organization "refers to the learner's internalization of values and beliefs involving (1) the conceptualization of values; and (2) the organization of a value system. As values or beliefs become internalized, the leaner organizes them according to priority."

  • examine
  • clarify
  • systematize
  • create
  • integrate

5. Characterization "refers to the learner's highest of internalization and relates to behavior that reflects (1) a generalized set of values; and (2) a characterization or a philosophy about life. At this level the learner is capable of practicing and acting on their values or beliefs."

  • internalize
  • review
  • conclude
  • resolve
  • judge

Affective Domain & Instructional Methods

Now that you’ve returned with a document on affective domain elements, look over the following list. If you’d like further information on some of these strategies refer to: http://www.honebein.com/astd/Methods.htm

From the list below, choose 20 instructional methods and categorize them into the affective element they most support in your opinion. You may list an instructional method under more than one affective element.

File:MUIS.jpg

Analyzing the Data

Are there blatant methods that don’t help support affective considerations? (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fwkiGV5Mp3Q) Where are the gray lines? Which methods appear in the most affective element categories?

It may be helpful to gather some basic occurrence statistics in a diagram or pie chart. Consider some of the following as a means of summarizing your findings (your visual interpretations would contain specific labels, where generics are used below):

File:Ex pie chart.jpgFile:Ex chart.jpg

Compile Your Findings

Compile a findings report in the discussion/submission area of this site.

    • Include any diagrams & pie charts (see image-loading instructions under this site's resources area (I'll put this up later).
    • Discuss what you judge to be the most successful and least successful methods for addressing affective issues/objectives.
    • Create an affective objective and describe 1 instructional method you would use to construct a lesson covering your created objective.
    • Submit your example affective objective and instructional method choice in the discussion/submission area of this lesson.


Other Affective Strategies

The linked-article below discusses Affective considerations in the Pharmaceutical discipline. Read this article identifying what affective techniques were used and for what objective. Did the techniques-objectives discussed work? Do you see these as solid affective decisions? Is there something else or more that you might do to encourage the achievements mentioned in the article?

Self-Directed Professional Development: The Pursuit of Affective Learning



Lesson Resources
Below you will find instructional materials to aid you in the navigation & participation in this lesson; you will also find academic articles and points of interest.
Instructions on Loading a File to Wikiversity

Lesson Submission Area

Lkirkner 02:41, 29 March 2007 (UTC)

Day to Day Discussions[edit]

Tasks - I compared the tasks of this lesson to our objectives and found that they didn't quite match up. So, I've reworked them a little. Please rework again as anyone sees fit, but I think there should be a near direct correlation.
1) Create a table in a Microsoft Word document that outlines the major components of cognitive learning, psychomotor & affective. Submit this via email to the professor.
2) You, the learner, will think back on your own experiences and describe in a learning journal (online or paper based) one good learning experience and one bad one. Include in your discussion the affective outcomes (such as increased/decreased motivation, constructive or destructive anxiety, changes in self-confidence). You will also need to relate your own experiences to the concepts and discussion in articles from the Learning Resource section and other relevant readings of your own choosing.
3) Finally, using this lesson as a new situation, you should discuss the affective dimensions of your learning as you progressed through this activity. Detail affective experiences present and absent.

These tasks seem to more closely align with the objectives at the opening of our lesson, which I reprint here:
1) Learners will be able to differentiate between the affective domain and other domains
2) Learners will recall personal learning experiences and identify the affective components
3) Learners will examine new situations to determine the affective considerations

Lesson Summary: I also added some material here (appears in the actual lesson above, most of which came from the articles in our lesson. Again, please add/modify as you see fit.
Thanks, Laurie. Lkirkner 17:59, 18 March 2007 (UTC)

Hi Chrisie - I was thinking more about the format than the content. I liked how the lesson flowed and felt this structure might help us along.

I will work on designing a story telling activity when I have some time. I hope everyone can share at least one story about an affective learning outcome, good or bad. Again, I will try to contribute to the existing proto activity and Overview and/or Theoretical Underpinnings.
Jonesbre 14:38, 7 March 2007 (UTC)Brent


Brent - Hope skiing was fun!! About the activity - are you wanting to pull the idea of having the learner think about different theorists and what they would have to say about the affective domain? Or something more than that?
I definitely like the idea of sharing personal stories, especially if one of our goals is to get the learners to come up with their own stories, this will be a nice jumping off point.

I also will continue to fill in information above: I think the next step is to determine high-level topics, then to decide how we want to present each one.

Chrisie 15:42, 6 March 2007 (UTC)


Hi team,
Sorry to be incommunicado for the past few days. I took a short ski trip with my family and have been busy moving offices. I have most of the boxes unpacked but still don't have an internet connection. I am writing this from home.
It seems like we have a good start on the first lesson. Here are a few of my observations, ideas.

First, I like the structure of the lesson in the following link listed by Laurie.

http://midsolutions.org/samples/MC72quest/gagne_and_boys_online.htm

I think we can use this as a model for one or more of our activities. This example also provides a nice structure for evaluation, i.e. we list what the evaluation will include but don't actually offer formal evaluation or feedback.

I also agree with Laurie that we will need to provide some resources but suggest we limited this to two or three really good articles per activity. I think the Miller paper (http://www.coe.uga.edu/epltt/affective.htm) offers some useful insight and the Turk article (http://www.ecu.edu.au/conferences/herdsa/main/papers/ref/pdf/Turk.pdf) builds on this. We will eventually have a comprehensive overview, background information and links under Theoretical Underpinnings and elsewhere, so we don't need to go overboard.

I will try to add to the activity and one or more of the other headings when I have time this week. I was also thinking of an activity where we each share a story or anecdote about a learning experience and then ask learners to identify the affective behaviors and micro strategies. I can take the lead on this if everyone agrees this might be something we want to pursue.

Talk to you soon. Brent


Chrisie and Lance, I like what you've done with the language of the objective. I think as we hone in on the details of this, an even more particular list of interim objectives will take shape...methods-conditions-outcomes
I found some resources that group members can evaluate for usefulness in this lesson.
resources about the domain

resources about the application of the domain

More Later ~ Thanks ~ Lkirkner 03:04, 4 March 2007 (UTC)

I reworded the objective slightly per Lance's suggestions - please feel free to edit further though. I've also started an outline for our first lesson (posted above); again, this is nothing more than brainstorming, I may be thinking too big or too small for one lesson, feel free to edit. Chrisie 19:35, 2 March 2007 (UTC)


I posted some of my ideas in the document right after it was posted earlier but I don't know if any of you have seen it. It might be obsolete now. I can post it in here if you'd all like. Chrisie, I will support your first try! I will contribute as much as I can to your effort. I'm sure you'll do fine.

I think the objective you've chosen to start is great (activates prior knowledge and experience). I think we need to be careful with "develop an appreciation". What does this mean? At what level? How do we measure it? I think that we should maybe change it to something like what we are doing in this class, writing a pro position. If our learners are able to write a good pro position for affective considerations, we would have a pretty good idea that they at least understands its importance and possibly appreciate its existence as a domain. Rewrite "Support (in writing) a pro position for affective stratefies by exploring past learning experiences and identifying the presence or absense of affective considerations in those learning experiences.Lance 22:46, 1 March 2007 (UTC)

Laurie - Great idea, I like the red/blue idea and I especially like leaving them a color until they’re no longer relevant or have been decided then back to black. I also like starting with your suggested objective “Learners will develop an appreciation for affective strategies by exploring their own learning experiences and identifying the presence or absence of affective considerations in their experiences.”

As for leading – In the spirit of total honesty – I am feeling a bit out of my element here and am nervous; I’m not sure I yet have a clear vision of how this will shake out or how it will look. That being said, I am willing to collect and polish and post as long as everyone promises to be really supportive and kind. =) Now – if someone else is feeling really confident or has a great vision of this in their head, I will certainly yield and will lead later, but if everyone is feeling equally unsure…. Chrisie 18:43, 1 March 2007 (UTC)


Chrissie, I agree that we could use colored text to track the newness of information being posted. I would like to suggest that new comments be posted in red ("CC0000"). After a day the comment can be changed (either by author or whomever notices that the post isn't new). We could change posts over a day (or a week?) old in a paler color, perhaps this blue ("3333CC"). Items that we finalize can be changed to black. What do you all think?

I've been involved in some home renovations that have kept me off-line for a few days, but am digging in today all aspects of our class. I liked Pete's suggestion that for each objective one person volunteers to take the lead and handle the editing/posting primarily. We submit work and the leader polishes. Would anyone like to take the driver's seat on this first objective? I like the idea of starting with the objective, "Learners will develop an appreciation for affective strategies by exploring their own learning experiences and identifying the presence or absence of affective considerations in their experiences." It's a 'friendly' way to ease learners into the topic of affective study; it starts by having learners attach a perceived value (of the affective domain) to previous experiences, which may increase their motivation for studying the rest of the lesson. It seems the first two orders of business are to pick the objective to address first and to determine who will drive on this one. Thanks! Lkirkner 17:30, 1 March 2007 (UTC)

In light of what Dr. Honebein has said above, one suggestion would be to decide on an objective to begin with and then start working on a strawman (I don't know if this is a term the people I work with made up or not, but it means basically an outline that the storyboard is built upon) and then since we will be our own SMEs, start filling in from there.

I'm assuming that each objective will be a lesson and then each lesson will have interim objectives, will provide information, will include a task for review and then will have some type of assessment (does wiki support any kind of assessment?).

Where does everyone else stand on how to proceed?

PS - I'm making this red b/c it's new, but obviously if we keep doing that, it will just all be red - we should have some sort of system or organization or this thing is going to get very clutered and I fear people will miss new information posted. Mabye a font color the first day then back to black? Maybe making sure we post at the top? Other suggestions? Chrisie 19:02, 28 February 2007 (UTC)


Good Afternoon, Team!
It's 02/26/07 & I believe our design document is due sometime today.

I attach here a draft that I've been working on. I tried to include what we brainstormed and removed the repetitiveness of most of it. There are still some unfinished areas that need attention. Perhaps we can each take a look at it, each add to the "empty" sections today, and share. I would volunteer to collect everyone's work and consolidate it again into one document. And, we might have a final revision.

How does this sound? Let's try to hammer something out ASAP, please.

Attached file: Affective Domain design document DRAFT

Lkirkner 18:10, 26 February 2007 (UTC)


Lance's

Goal: Present instructional strategies (concepts) and how to use them in designs or how to design with them (procedure).

Learning Outcome: Learners will become confident and knowledge affective domain designers with a rich toolbox of affective methods and strategies.

Audience: Our audience will be instructional designers who are having a hard time designing for the affective domain. They could be new IDers or veterans. They all have a GAP!! Designing for the affective domain and eliciting affective behaviors!

Objectives:

1. Given objectives that are based on the affective domain, list instructional strategies and methods that would help acheive the objectives, discuss why, and defend your reasoning.

2. Identify instructional strategies and methods that best align with each level of the affective taxonomy, discuss why, and defend your reasoning.

3. Given a design document, evaluate whether or not the stratgies and methods within the document meet the affective needs of the particular course.

4. Given a list of instructional strategies and methods, associate them in a diagram with the different elements of the affective domain and taxonomy.

5. Given a "affective" instructional scenario, create a design document and design one module to meet the needs of the audience.

6. After observing instructional examples, evaluate how well the instructional strategies and methods used meet the apparent objectives.

There could be much more


Here are some ideas for course objectives. We also need to compile a design document by Monday. I will post the outline below. Please add to or modify any section you feel needs it.

Brent's

These are fairly generic and could have wide applicability.

  1. Learners will demonstrate a willingness to invest time in unsolicited self study activities.
  2. Learners will demonstrate a tolerance for ambiguity when presented with an as-yet unencountered problem.
  3. Learners will demonstrate a willingness to consult with peers when they have a question or are unsure of how to proceed.

Some ideas I included earlier are

Goal 1 Learners will gain an understanding of important considerations when selecting micro strategies for eliciting target affective behaviors.

Objective 1 Presented with a context (conditions) and target affective outcome(s), learners will demonstate the ability to select an appropriate instructional micro strategy (method) and explain their selection process.

Objective 2 Presented with a context (conditions), target outcome(s) and instructional micro strategy (methods), learners will demonstrate the ability to write a critique of the selected micro strategy.


Chrisie's

(theory) Learners will defend their choice of instructional method using resources provided in [our] instructional unit.

(practice) Learners will create quality instruction using their knowledge of the affective domain.

Laurie's

Modified Objectives in a Procedure-Oriented framework… These are overarching goals/objectives, for which specific sub-objectives would be written, but I thought we should nail down what the procedural (and/or topical) we want to include before working on specific tasks to induce the achievement of…

  1. Procedure: Review and become familiar with history/research of affective learning/domain
  2. Procedure: Distinguish & apply the dimensions of development
  3. Procedure: Given a series of general goals (cognitive, psychomotor or affective), write specific applicable objectives containing: procedure, conditions, criteria
  4. Procedure: Apply Reigeluth’s et al’s application model to real-world situations
  5. Procedure: designing a lesson for a cognitive or psychomotor skill, using affective techniques/principles

Design Document[edit]

Here is Chrisie's Morrison structure

  1. Identify instructional problems and specify goals for creating instruction
  2. examine learner characteristics
  3. Identify subject content and analyze task components related to stated goals and purposes
  4. specify the instructional objectives
  5. sequence content within each instructional unit for logical learning
  6. design instructional strategies so that each learner can master the objectives
  7. plan the instructional message and devlop the instruction
  8. develop evaluation instruments
  9. select resources to support instruction.

--Lance 04:18, 24 February 2007 (UTC) Introduction

This document outlines our team's analysis of the task of designing an instructional unit on micro-strategies with affective domain objectives.

Course Goals/Objectives

Our working list of goals and objectives includes:

Goals

  1. To help learners understand what the affective domain is and how it differs from other domains. (from Brent in oncourse) To use examples, anecdotes, metaphors, and analogies to help learners understand the affective domain. (these are the same goal. Brent just mentions some strategies to achieve it. Basically, we want our audience to understand [what level?] the affective domain)(UTC)--Lance 04:18, 24 February 2007 (UTC))Chrisie 20:25, 23 February 2007 (UTC)
  2. Present learners with instructional strategies, methods and theories (concepts) and how to use them in designs or how to design with them for the affective domain (procedure). (I combined these as well because, again, they are essentially the same. Basically we want learners to have a toolbox of strategies and methods and to know how to apply them)))Chrisie 20:25, 23 February 2007 (UTC)--Lance 04:37, 24 February 2007 (UTC)
  3. To help learners to evaluate and critique examples of instruction based on affective domain objectives (basically, they would be able to support a position of whether what they observe is good uses of strategies, good choices of strategies or vice versa for instruction in the affective domain)--Lance 04:37, 24 February 2007 (UTC)
  4. to help learners actually create some instruction for objectives based on the affective domain--Lance 04:37, 24 February 2007 (UTC)

Summary - we make sure they understand the domain. we make sure they master the strategies and how they apply (toolbox and its use). We make sure they can critique any affective situation for its use of stratgies and methods. Finally, we make sure they can design for the affective domain. that how I see it. I just took what Chrisie did and expanded a bit.--Lance 04:37, 24 February 2007 (UTC)

Audience Characteristics

  • A student or practitioner or instructional design; male and female
  • Age: 23-65 - this takes into account the youngest grad student just starting out to the nearly retired practitioner.
  • Within the age group, our audience could be lacking in the following areas:
    • Knowledge or awareness of the affective domain
    • Knowledge or awareness of strategies and/or methods useful in designing instruction to elicit affective behaviors
    • Skills in evaluating and critiqueing instructional effectiveness
    • Design skills when presented with a topic and objectives aligned with the affective domain
  • Our audience has a basic to expert knowledge in much of the ID field. We can assume the they would be familiar with common ID terminology and process at least at the basic level.

(I think that, considering the proposed age range, individuals would come to this site because they lack a good understanding of this domain and how to design for it. It can be very difficult, even for the best designers, to acheive learning outcomes in this area. Our lessons would give this audience a good foundation and a toolbox to apply to any instructional challenge that is based on the affective domain.)

  • our audience is mostly self motivated and eager to learn and improve upon skills. The majority would seek our lessons as a key resource. Few might be sent to our site to learn. Many will come thinking of specific projects they are currently working on or will in the future.
  • ID is still somewhat of a specialized field which may help us know what kind of individual is in our audience. We should design for an audience that is very smart, academically and practically minded, and able to think critically. They will obviously be wired to grasp instructional design concepts and procedures more quickly than someone not associated with or interested in ID.--Lance 05:21, 24 February 2007 (UTC)

Subject Content

Affective domain content references: http://itc.utk.edu/~jklittle/edsmrt521/affective.html (Krathwohl) or http://www.olemiss.edu/depts/educ_school2/docs/stai_manual/manual9.htm (Bloom)--Lance 05:58, 24 February 2007 (UTC)

Definition of Affective Domain Chrisie 04:52, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

Applying the affective domain (fairly specific to the sciences) Chrisie 04:52, 25 February 2007 (UTC)


What other content overview can we add here?

Key Concepts and Procedures: Task Breakdown

Attach to previous experience

    Journal about poor learning experiences vs the most memorable learning experiences (What separates the two? What was essential to the positive experience (regarding the people there, the environment, what was going on internally)?


  • Research at least 2 articles on affective learning (allow choice, but provide at least a handful)

Article Suggestion: WBL vs. f2f instruction - differences in affective domain. (Probably need to log in to view) Chrisie 04:40, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

  • Outline major concepts…then choose either a argumentation, comparison, evaluation perspective and share in a discussion area
  • After reading peer postings, post a summarizing statement in which you articulate the overarching ideas found in all.
  • Create an FAQ for a basic affective domain introduction website/class


  • Learn the six dimensions

Sorry for the stupid question, but I must have missed something - what acronym are you referring to here? Chrisie 05:19, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

  • Create an alternate phrase from the acronym (EMSSAM, can change order)
  • Create an image-term slide show to help learn the dimensions
  • Distinguish between and know which goals fall into which dimension
  • Create a 2-example-2-non-example chart of the dimensions
  • Create a role-play scenario in which participates experience a particular affective dimension
  • Discuss: How could you handle, say, the social dimension through cognitive, psychomotor and affective means? Can you begin to think of each dimension in these different contexts (cognitive, psychomotor, affective)?


  • Learn components of application model (topics, orientation, breadth, integration, duration, personal, instructional methods of curriculum)
  • Using personal workplace, determine a problem or preemptive issue that could be addressed and the dimensions of affective development being affected
  • Interview/apprenticeship, role model exercise
  • Culmination of knowledge/application
  • Lesson creation…


  • Select appropriate affective strategies for given goals/problem-resolution
    more here...

Lkirkner 02:03, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

(obviously a lot more work can go into this)

  • CONCEPTS
    • Affective Domain
    • Instructional Strategies and Methods
  • PROCEDURES
    • Evaluating, Critiqueing
    • Designing
    • Applying conceptsLance 05:58, 24 February 2007 (UTC)

Our goal is to present micro-strategies that can be used by designers to teach learners concepts in the affective domain (such as attitude and motivation). Our procedure to accomplish this will include the following:

  • introduce several micro-strategies we feel are particularly useful for the affective domain
  • offer examples, stories, etc of how these methods can be implemented in various types of instruction
  • offer research that supports the use of these methods?
  • Explain some of the theory/models that support instructing on the affective domain?

Chrisie 19:55, 24 February 2007 (UTC) this needs to go in the goals section. If you read what is already in the goals section, I think what you have written is covered. I would suggest that we edit what is already there. Just a thought--Lance 21:58, 24 February 2007 (UTC)

Sounds good - what are we envisioning for the "procedures" then? Chrisie 23:26, 24 February 2007 (UTC)

Objectives

(1) Provided with a bank of literature (texts, articles, websites) and the option to conduct independent research, learners will differentiate the dimensions of affective development in a short essay. Lkirkner 01:17, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

(2) Given a series of general goals (cognitive, psychomotor or affective), learners will write specific applicable affective objectives containing: procedure, conditions, criteria. Lkirkner 01:17, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

(3) Learners will design a short lesson (or activities within a lesson) for an affective, cognitive or psychomotor skill, using affective techniques/principles. Lkirkner 01:17, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

(4) Provided with a bank of literature (texts, articles, websites) and the option to conduct independent research, learners will select a few strategies and connect the strategy with affective objectives.

(5) Learners will develop an appreciation for affective strategies by exploring their own learning experiences and identifying the presence or absence of affective considerations in their experiences. Lkirkner 02:03, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

(6)

Sequence

  • Learners are lured into the lesson with "something" and begin stimulating their recollections about affective experiences
  • Learners visit websites, read provided articles, are encouraged to research on their own, and just generally begin acclimating themselves to the affective domain, its dimensions and components.
    • gaining first an overall sense of the domain
    • breaking the domain into smaller parts and having students conduct application practice
  • provide examples (non-examples, anecdotes, etc.) of applications of affective methods...have students identify, evaluate, defend, discuss
  • begin building components of an affective lesson or building the affective components of a cognitive/pyschomotor lesson...
  • just brainstorming here...

Lkirkner 02:30, 25 February 2007 (UTC)

Our Strategies

Plan for development

Evaluation of Design and Learning

References/SupportLance 05:58, 24 February 2007 (UTC)

Design Decisions Here are some of the design decisions I was considering. (Brent)

  1. Clear performance objectives will be established at both the macro (module) and micro (task/activity) levels.
  2. Criterion-referenced test items will be developed to clearly measure progress and performance.
  3. All components will have the underlying goal of increasing familiarity with designing instruction targeting the affective domain.
  4. Material should be relevant to IDers who design for either face-to-face or online contexts.
  5. Material should complement the work done by teams working on the other domain modules.

In designing the module and component activities we will rely on the following list of guiding principals.

  • Effective and efficient use of existing resources,
  • Balance between theorical and practical considerations,
  • Balance between concept learning and procedural learning,
  • Activities and materials that appeal to various learning styles,
  • Activities and materials that are intrinsically motivating,
  • Teaching methodology based on accepted and emerging theories of learning,
  • Activities and materials that promote success and boost confidence


Conclusions

== Content from Article Page, 3/12/07 I've moved the previous content on the article page here so as to establish a consistent UI Welcome to our discussion of the affective domain as related to instructional design and micro strategies. These pages will include a basic introduction to designing instruction that targets outcomes in this domain. We will also look at the "why" and "how" of selecting specific strategies to promote positive affective outcomes and avoiding or decreasing negative outcomes.

"No profit grows where no pleasure is taken; In brief, sir, study what you most affect." ~William Shakespeare~

Introduction[edit]

Learning Experience[edit]

References/Bibliography[edit]

Bandura, A. (1994). Self-efficacy. In V. S. Ramachaudran (Ed.), Encyclopedia of human behavior (Vol. 4, pp. 71-81). New York: Academic Press. Available online at [4]


Duncan-Hewitt, W., Leise, C., & Hall, A. (no date). Affective Domain. Available online at [5]


Koballa, T. (no date). Framework for the Affective Domain in Science Education. Available online at [6]


Miller, M . (2005). Learning and teaching in the affective domain. In M. Orey (Ed.), Emerging perspectives on learning, teaching, and technology. Available online at [7]


Site Design Discussion Area (Ask a question)[edit]

Team, I have moved this discussion history to the Discussion tab. From now on, that's where discussion and brainstorming should be associated Phonebein 20:37, 27 February 2007 (UTC)